Keeping Mayfly Central Current

Dentatella coxalis Dentatella coxalis
Rivière-du-Loup, Quebec
Artist: Lu Sun

What's New?

27 March 2020 update: A historical misspelling of Arthroplea bipunctata is added.

14 January 2020 statement: Several genera included in our current lists are recognized either as subgenera or as junior synonyms of other genera in Burian SK. 2019. Chapter 13 Ephemeroptera. Pp. 263-339. In: R. W. Merritt, K.W. Cummins, and M.B. Berg. (eds.). An Introduction to the Aquatic Insects of North America., 5th Edition. Kendall Hunt Publishing, Company, Dubuque, Iowa, 1480 pp. However, the new or reinstated genus-species combinations that would result from these synonymies are not listed in this chapter. Genus-species combinations are listed on Mayfly Central only if they have been explicitly stated in recent, reputable, peer-reviewed publications and only if they follow the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature. The synonymies referenced above created some unpublished combinations in Afghanurus, Stenonema, and Tricorythodes. If only published combinations in these genera were listed here, then inconsistent genus concepts would be followed in the North and Central American lists. Therefore, at this time, we are not listing species of Ableptemetes, Homoleptohyphes, Tricoryhyphes, and Asioplax in Tricorythodes; we are not listing species of Maccaffertium in Stenonema; and we are not listing species of Ecdyonurus and Nixe in Afghanurus. The status of the genus Dentatella has been part of a long-running academic debate. Until a more thorough study of Eurylophella phylogenetics is completed, Dentatella is recognized for D. coxalis (McDunnough, 1926). A neighbor-joining tree based on DNA barcode data [see Webb et al. 2012. PLoS One 7(5): Figure S1] was used to justify the most recent synonymy of Eurylophella and Dentatella in the chapter referenced above. This tree is an unreliable proxy for phylogenetic reconstruction, probably due to long branch attraction; for example, some other species of Ephemerellidae closely related to Dentatella nest within the family Leptophlebiidae [see again Webb et al. 2012. PLoS One 7(5): Figure S1].

Updates

Current Update: March 27, 2020

Former Updates:

  • January 21, 2020
  • April 9, 2019
  • March 27, 2019
  • March 11, 2019
  • November 15, 2018
  • September 4, 2018
  • March 19, 2018
  • September 20, 2017
  • September 13, 2017
  • May 9, 2017
  • April 19, 2017
  • January 11, 2016
  • July 8, 2015
  • February 2, 2015
  • June 17, 2014
  • February 4, 2014
  • July 10, 2013
  • March 12, 2012
  • February 8, 2011
  • March 8, 2010
  • February 26, 2009
  • October 22, 2008
  • August 30, 2006
  • July 19, 2005
  • January 14, 2005
  • July 14, 2004
  • December 12, 2003
  • July 9, 2002
  • January 7, 2002
  • July 19, 2001
  • February 2, 2001
  • September 22, 2000
  • May 12, 2000
  • March 27, 2000
  • August 12, 1999
  • July 6, 1999
  • January 15, 1999
  • February 9, 1998
  • January 10, 1997
  • June 21, 1996
  • September 15, 1995

Staying Current

The documentation provided herein is subject to continuous change and modification as researchers continue to learn more about the species makeup of mayflies in North America, their relationships, and their distribution. The electronic medium, in addition to allowing ideal searching and indexing capabilities, allows the documentation to remain continually current.

Immediate updating is possible as new data are published. The contents will be updated on a continuous basis, at least annually, as of the Current Update, given above. With such a large and detailed documentation, it is possible that inadvertent errors and omissions have occurred, even though every effort has been made to eliminate them. The data presentation has been proofread by mayfly specialists at Mayfly Central and elsewhere.